About your Search

20120928
20121006
STATION
CSPAN 3
CNN 2
CNNW 2
CSPAN2 2
KTVU (FOX) 1
MSNBC 1
MSNBCW 1
WBFF (FOX) 1
LANGUAGE
English 19
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
sapphire preferred. >>> the supreme court reconvenes monday with critical civil rights cases on the agenda. but it's november 6th, presidential election day, that could be the biggest day for the future of the court. the average age of the supreme court justices is 66. four justices are in their mid to late 70s. the ideologically divided bench could swing either way depending on who sits in the oval office when the next justice retires. joining me is patricia ann millate head of the firm's supreme court practice. good morning. >> good morning. >> i know you've argued 31 cases before the supreme court. has that experience given you any insight into who might be the next justice to retire? >> well, i think it's very likely that the next president's going to have at least one, and maybe even two appointments on the court. obviously just statistically, if you look at age, justice ginsburg, ruth bader ginsburg is the most likely one if you just look at age. the longest serving ones, justices scalia and kennedy on the court. those type of factors obviously weigh in. >> i'm going to have myr d ja
win and my retort is if you look back over the years, from women's suffrage, civil rights, to more recently the alternative ener movement, have been borne from third parties garn hing enough votes away from the two major political parties so engrained in the status quo that they never impose the sweeping changes so i hope you can comment on the role of third parties not necessarily in winning elections but in changing the agenda to the point where we get the changes we end up treasuring over the next century. host: thank you for the call. dr. jill stein. guest: thank you for making that point, which is very important. in fact, what so many people call progress in this country, whether you talk about women getting the right to vote, the abbitionist slavery, the protection of workers in the workplace, the right to organize, the 40 hour work week, child labor laws, social social security, the new deal, you name it, all of these have come out of independent third parties, because as you say, the party that is are bought and paid for by large corporations which are part of the status qu
. contrast that with a judge that was blocked by the democrats on civil rights grounds because he was not on abortion. it has nothing to do with black people anymore. who was i talking about? host: charles pickering. guest: he was a prosecutor prosecuting the klan. he was putting his life at jeopardy and sent his kids to public schools. not white liberals. host: this is missy in buffalo. good morning. caller: i think you're brilliant. you are my role model. i just wanted to say that and i can wait to read your book. i know your book covers the 1970's and 1980's. the one topic they bring up with republicans is slavery. the republicans had a huge role in ending slavery, they still use that as a talking point against our party. guest: and the apocryphal southern strategy. that is the most amazing rewrite in history. in my third book, a large part of that was telling the truth of joe mccarthy. that covered about five years. liberals have reread the history to cover 200 years. republicans or the party to talk about slavery. it was for the next 100 years with platforms endorsing justice
, engaged the senators in discussion of how he felt about the issues, and it became clear he felt the civil rights act, a thomas just think, he thought there was no such thing as a right to privacy to the constitution, and the senate by a vote of 58-42 said to conservative and he was voted down. ronald reagan nominated instead to that seat anthony kennedy, who was serving a liberal but was certainly no robert bork either. and he has had a long and distinguished career as, now the swing vote on the court. and that really, that set, that really set up the rehnquist years. accord which i wrote about in my last book, "the nine," and when i started looking at the supreme court in a serious way as a writer, i was inspired by book that i'm sure is familiar to many of you called the brethren by scott armstrong and bob woodward, really a great book, first real behind the scenes book of the supreme court. and 15, the theme of the book was also justices, regardless of politics couldn't stand were in burger. they thought he was at pompous jerk. that sort of contention has been the rule more than the ex
. >> he takes legislation that wasn't going to pass civil rights, the tax cut bill and in an in tant johnson gets it moving towards passage. >> thank you very, very, very much. >> chris: last week, caro took part in the library of congress book festival on the national mall and made clear he made johnson come alive for many reader. >> chris: do you like him? >> i don't like him or dislike him. you are in awe of him because you are constantly saying look at what he is doing now. >> chris: he got excited talking about johnson's rise to power but as we turn to the final book he is writing now, his demeanor suddenly changed. >> the story is going to turn very dark as soon as vietnam enters the picture. it is sort of a tragic story. a story of his great dreams that are the destroyed by a war. >> chris: you are 76 now. do you ever worry that you are not going to have time to finish this last book? >> well, sure. but, you know, it is not productive to think like that. >> chris: how long do you think it will take you to finish? >> i could say three or four years but why would you believe me?
versus board. i said i think this is the civil rights issue of our generation. the dividing line is not race or class, but around educational opportunity. if we're serious about closing the achievement gap, we have to close the opportunity gap. i do not think we have had anything near the sense of urgency and commitment to closing those gaps that we need to. to look at the staggering inequities and inequalities, we have to get better faster. all those things compel us to act. the president has provided leadership. he understands what is at stake. congress has been supportive. we have to work on this together and put politics and the ideology aside. we have to educate our way to a better economy. i talk about a cradle to career agenda. we have to start with early childhood education. i could make a compelling case that is the best investment we can make. if we can get our babies into kindergarten and ready to read, we start to close the gaps. if we do not do that, we're playing catch-up. we play catch up at every level of the education system. many of our colleges today, 50% of yo
of the poor and study the indifference to civil rights. a lot who lived through it seemed to think the best thing about george bush, he is not ronald reagan. ♪ ♪ >> largely as as a result of the policy and priority of reagan administration, more people are becoming poor and staying poor in the country than many times since world war ii. ♪ >> if there's anything left ronald reagan trickle down theory it seems to be anxiety which seems to be trickle down through every segment of our society. ♪ if you give complearns thomas a little flower you think you have david talking. here is a man who is against everything that has lifted the level of life of -- [inaudible] ♪ i egg and butter many black men do a [inaudible] >> has hard too. he's remember rehenceble person. ♪ your words trickle down terrorist who face their agenda on division, exclusion, and fear. do you think middle class americans are in need of protection. ♪ the new republican majority congress took a big step on the legislative agenda to demolish or damage government-aid programs many of them designed to help children an
presidency. imagine what it would mean for civil rights and voting rights and so much more. >> reporter: but if the president is re-elected, what effect would it have on the court? >> well, president obama could have big impact on the court is if one of the more conservative justices, like swing vote anthony kennedy or justice antonin scalia who are both in their mid-70s, if they retired, then president obama could replace a conservative or a right leaning moderate. >> reporter: here's who could make the nominee list if president obama wins a second term. california attorney general harris is getting a lot of buzz. >> the california attorney general has political experience, which is really missing on the court right now. >> reporter: another name circulating is ja kwlen wen. if she's nominated, the california-based federal appeals judge would make history as the court's first asian-american justice. but that's no guarantee. and for example if ruth bader ginsburg is the only justice to retire, the liberal side of the court would not get any bigger. just a little younger. >> and as you k
.s. citizen, i have a long and proud history of peaceful civil disobedience to draw on when facing injustice like racism or any other kind of movements throughout this country's history in which civil disobedience has been used, such as the women's rights movement or in the protest in the war in vietnam. >> this took place when the united nations general assembly was in town. here you are asking police what you're being arrested for. what were you charged with? >> eventually -- i wasn't told on the spot. i was neither read my rights nor was i told what i was being arrested for. but later at one of the precincts where i was held, and before i was taken to central booking, i was told i was charged with criminal mischief, making graffiti and possessing a graffiti instrument. i was after 22 hours arraigned before a judge and i'm supposed to return in november to see whether i will be put on trial on these charges or not. >> do you think that spray painting this particular ad was a form of peaceful disobedience? was that what you were trying to sort of -- the message you were trying to send? >> m
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)